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20121031
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capacity in the late 1990s when he was covering the charter of -- [inaudible] in los angeles as part of city government. i was chairing an elected commission in los angeles to revise the city charter, and i saw then that he not only was amazingly talented, but a reporter of enormous integrity. at one point he believed the los angeles times was not devoting nearly enough time to charter reform, it was important to the city, and according to los angeles weekly, he quit his position at the los angeles times in protest over this. he put his very job on the line because he believed in the importance of the story. he was then and is now an enormous star of the los angeles times. and as a result of that, the los angeles times decided to change it approach and gave tremendous attention to charter reform. i will always believe that charter reform succeeded in 1999 in los angeles because of what jim newton did and the covers of the l.a. times. a few years ago he mentioned to me he was planning to take some time off to do a biography of earl warren. i thought it was a great idea. and then i had
for civilization. deputy stephen sorenson interesting enough was an x. server from the south bay in los angeles, and he, too, begin gravitating towards the desert at some point and had volunteered for the position of resident deputy and a very remote outpost. tops know that they have a dangerous line of work, and that anything that happens when they get up because she office that day. but very few of them will volunteer for a room a beat like this because if you get called to a domestic violence incident, say, if you take an hour for back up to right. this is a violent and dangerous beak and it takes a certain kind of person to want to take it on your and the fact i at one point asked, i sat down with the sheriff, the chief sheriff of los angeles county shows department at one point, and this is like i think the six most powerful law enforcement agency in the world. it's huge. and i said why would somebody, why did deputy sorenson volunteer for the beat? he said, whatever it was, it was his mission to protect god's creation. i thought that really told me a lot about deputy sorenson. and as you
, the famous defense attorney, stood on a downtown los angeles sidewalk and he watched his chief investigator seized by the police caught in the act of bribing a juror. a few weeks later, darrow was indicted on two counts of bribery, and burt franklin, the investigator, agreed to testify against them. he swore that darrow had ordered him to pay $4000 to jurors who agreed to vote not guilty. and darrow was at that time at the height of the same one of america's foremost trial lawyers, political leaders and populist champions, and his careened staggered off track there in southern california. caught up by shame he left his wife one reunite for the apartment of his mistress. with a revolver in one pocket and a whiskey barrel -- whiskey bottle in the other, he sat down and vowed to kill them so. she brought out two glasses. they sat at a wooden table underneath one of those swinging bare lightbulbs. and fortunately for us she talked him out of it. he went on to create an american architect, lawyer for the little guy, advocate for the common folk. poking his thumbs, regarding the jury from beneath
and pensacola and knew something was wrong. in another desert community outside of los angeles, there was a daughter who also sensed impending doom and she knew the enwas near. animals with their keener hearing responded to the softer note that the singer's grim melody for all living things respond to music. and would come in from points south, east, north, and west of the trailer to be fed and nourished by the man who loved them but hated cops. in the morning, the jackrabbits were the first to arrive. putting themselves around the special outdoor breakfast table with portions of food placed at individual settings. other critters would stop by drought the throughout the day on their rounds. a raven would alite on a man's arm. amazing for their able to go for days without water and often seen skittering across the sands would find a rare moment of rest in their perpetual state of panic, oblivious to the day that inside the trailer, the magazines loaded with high svelte rounds and the hand-written will, perhaps calmed by the repeating reverberation of the death song. so all livin
that nobody likes to talk about, but it really is the other half of los angeles, only 1/2. it's also desert and we were visiting, mark and i, and i was in the middle of finishing up my previous book and also working on another project about the antelope valley. suddenly we heard all the sirens screeching into the desert and not like one or two or five but dozens and dozens and dozens. even for that area, where you hear everything because sound travels very great distances in the desert and there are lots of police calls up there on domestic violence and so on and it can be a very violent place but also a peaceful place. so we decided to turn on the tv and find out what all the ruckus was about. it turned out that there was a beloved local sheriff named steven sorensen had been ambushed at a trailer in a remote town near lancaster in the city where i was visiting mark. it was quite a violent incident according to the early reports and by then it was an hour to after we had heard the first sirens. there were choppers flying around and six or seven different police agencies were converging wit
on airplanes. i was reading on a flight from los angeles and the man beside me gave me the strangest look. reading the "wall street journal" but he kept peeking at my book. [laughter] and would say this book could save your soul. [laughter] instead pineapple got horrible quanex three years. i am not opposed to phonics. i encourage teachers today to use it selectively in instances where they need it. but these books are created with crazy people in this country there is a woman in arizona there are strange people there. i will be there in three days. there is a woman in arizona but to speak about the homeless he comes up to me at the head as if there was a secret and says phonics. [laughter] i call her the fanatic fanatic of the next. [laughter] no pictures or drawings lower no plot. how does that grab you as a first grader? one sentence went on 18 pages. you can guess i don't know that was to teach the consonant or the foul progress add sam sat on the stand. then the teacher would ask the kids to predict what happens next. [laughter] pineapple learned next to nothing. the fall of her fift
hotel in los angeles for 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for bringing ancient history, elbow to elbow. that is the key as everyone knows. it is an honor to be here. trivial information. forget it when you are out the door. it is an honor to be here. having been an actor simon recovered actors who is now in my right mind and my left brain but having been there for a long time i appreciate the club and all the statement has done to create the first oasis in the desert that is hollywood. thank you for that. really appreciate it. [applause] deeply appreciate all the amazing work that david did. you were magnificent on all the news channels exposing the travesty of the current administration's policies living up to libya and since. i want to say thank you for being a champion of liberty and freedom. thank you. [applause] it is great restoration weekend and if you have not been, please get the tablet out there and we will go last year and we screened our film and we are able to be there and it is phenomenal. an opportunity for liberty lovers to share the most amazing mines, declari
there with a fellow and king lear. marvelous book. i read children's books on airplanes. on a flight to los angeles from boston. and gave me the strangest looks. he was reading the wall street journal. i noticed he kept peeking at my book to trade with him and this book could save your soul. in stead pineapple got these horrible tictac phonics readers. i am not opposed to phonics. i used to teach -- i encourage teachers to use phonics selectively for specific children in instances where they need it -- these book -- these are the books, the kind of folks created -- sort of crazy people in this country about phonics. there is a woman in arizona -- a lot of strange people in arizona. i am going to be there in three days so i hope they don't see the tape of this but there is a woman in arizona, every time i speak even when i went out to phoenix and spoke about the homeless families comes up to me at the end as though there was a secret between us and whispers to me phonics. i call her the fanatic fanatics from phoenix. pineapple was given this book, the first book in the series. no pictures. no lovely
to a 15-year-old and a 17-year-old. they were in los angeles and when she was 8-years-old, her parents put her and her 3-year-old brother on a train by themselves to go back from los angeles to chicago. there she continued to be mistreated by her grandparents until finally she was able to get off on her own and she went to work as a secretary in a factory. the owner of the factory married dorothy not year he was strong, she didn't communicate very well, she frequently had vicious arguments with his wife in which he spoke disparagingly to her. he wasn't that nice to his own children. one example is that as a child left the top of the toothpaste a jar in the bathroom he would take that off and threw it in the snow and make the child go and find it. basically dorothy was hilary's mother who essentially sustain her in three ways. first of all, she was deeply christian, she was a very active methodist, she wanted hillary to get them at the disfellowship and she met a young wonderful pastor named don jones and he was the one that helped introduce her to the whole issue of the morality of justice
in our direction, never. i mean you have the bradley effect from here in los angeles when tom bradley one time mayor of los angeles was running for re-election. he was way out ahead of the polls. he had truman dewey pen lines the next they were it said bradley had won the election based on the polls and the early returns and then it turned out no, he had lost. the same thing happened to doug wilder of virginia, david dinkins in new york and even when they won they pulled the actual results on election day and the polls came back and said they had a good excuse. people are lying to us because they don't want to tell us. by the way if there is ever an election that has the bradley effect operating this would be it. somebody called in and said from michigan, he brought, romney yarn side and -- yard sign and his wife city can put that up. people will think we are racist. that is what the argument is. we must purge our white guilt by reelecting a competent white president. in the exit polls in 2004, and don't know if you remember that. i certainly do. by 3:00 p.m. they assured that kerry had w
-year-old. they were in los angeles and when she was eight years old, her parents put her and her 3-year-old brother on a train by themselves to go back from los angeles to chicago. there she continued to be mistreated by her grandparents until finally she was able to get off on her own and went to work as a secretary in a factory. a lace curtain factory president owner of the factory was hugh and he married dorothy. hugh was gruff, he was strong, he didn't communicate very well, he frequently had vicious arguments which he wife which he spoke disparagingly and got eye abusive toward her. he was not that nice to his own children. one example is that as a child left the top off the tooth paste jar, the tube in the bedroom, he would take that tooth paste top throw it in snow and make the child find it. it was not someone whom you felt warmly toward. and basically discoure think was the person, hilary's mother who essentially sustained her. sustain sustainedder in three ways. she was an active mained death. she wanted her to go to the methodist youth fellowship she met a young pastor named
there was a revelation in los angeles that the republican national committee has been entertaining at at a lesbian bondage themed strip club. this did not work well, so they could not raise a dime. this gave for his opening. so he had a luncheon at his house in the weaver terrace. it was cohosted by a lsp, a former chair of the arun the senate had about two dozen people over and came away with tens and tens of millions of dollars. that luncheon alone gave him about four times as much money as the entire republican party. so rove was the fact that establishing an apparatus that gave an enormous amount of power and authority with almost no responsibility. he reported to no one, but he had his hands on the purse strings. this led to the 2010 legislative election. there is a total of $300 million swept congress. they took 63 seats in the house and suddenly obama's big advantage was gone. he had no real authority. this money -- the question is what did he do with the money? is going to go into the battleground state. and i started to look and what is going to do now. i decided to look at what he had do
to the opinion pages of the wall street journal, los angeles times, writes politics and policy review, national review, weekly standard among other journals. a senior fellow at the claremont institute, one of our closest thing tank allies which takes as its mission to restore the principles of the american founding. he is the intellectual muscle of that mission. he teaches in two of the programs. the program and the lincoln fellow program. most important, he is the editor of the claremont review books, the quarterly publication of the claremont institute. perhaps you are familiar with it. if you're not, i encourage you to be so and, perhaps to my even to subscribe. it is by far the most eloquent, well written, and should i say attractive reviews of books we will list in the united states today and is so because it is edited by charles custer. he has been thinking, teaching, and writing quite elytra to eloquently for some time. and he has now dne something very liberal, if not downright revolutionary witches he has written a book why is it based on president obama's own ridings across beaches, a
in northeast los angeles. it was predominantly a latino community. >> mostly illegal? >> i think it was a combination. there were a lot of immigrant families, but you know there were also legal and illegal family's. >> how did illegals view the illegals? >> i am not so sure about that because as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults. but what i do remember the most is being shy when i got to school. most of the kids in my classroom or dark-skinned and they look just like me and they had lost names like rcn gonzalez and hernandez and they could speak a language that i could not speak. that was really shocking to me because they looked exactly like me and yet they weren't. i would say that was probably the first time i was really aware of of the fact that there were a latino's, but they were different from me. >> you were in the esl classes, english as a second language classes? >> yes. >> was that a second class citizen type thing? >> yeah, definitely. being an esl student, that is who you are and that is the way people treat you, like an
neighborhoods across the nation. in june, robert kennedy was murdered in los angeles immediately after winning the california primary. then at the end of august, democrats manage chicago. cbs and nbc provided full coverage of both the republicans conventions, the bbc decided to give on the evening wrap ups. they hired korbel to deliver 15 minutes of commentary each night, and occur in the conservative point of view was william f. buckley. the editor and founder of the national review had established himself as the spokesman of american conservatism, author of god and man at now and other books have also had a syndicated newspaper column, on the right, and tv show, firing line. erudite and unearthly communist in his first elaborate breathy deliveries, manic eyebrows and reptilian, will. he is now remembered as a representative image when conservatives can be consider race, but buckley was ahead of his time in many ways. his exchanges during the republican convention in miami were testy, but with that seriousness sat. tv journalists, howard k. smith served as moderator. buckley support the war i
: in highland park in northeast los angeles, and it was predominantly a latino community. >> host: mostly illegal? >> guest: i think it was a combination, yeah, there were a lot of immigrant families, but, you know, there were also the legal and illegal families. >> host: how did the legals view the illegals? >> guest: i'm not too sure about that because as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults, but what i do remember the most is being shocked when i got to school that most of the kids in my classroom were dark skin, and they looked just like me and had names like garcia and hernandez, and they could speak a language i couldn't speak. that was shocking to me because they looked exactly like me, and, yet, they weren't. i would say that was probably the first time i was really aware of the fact that they were latinos, but they were different from me. >> host: you were in esl classes? english as a second language classes? >> guest: yeah. >> host: was that a second class citizen type thing? being in that class? >> guest: definitely, being an esl stude
los angeles. it was predominately latino community. >> host: mostly illegal? >> guest: i think it was a combination. yeah, there were a lot of immigrant families, but they're also legal legal and illegal families. >> host: out of the legal dispute the ev goes? >> guest: i'm not too sure about that because as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults. but what i do remember the most is being shocked when i got to school at that most of the kids in my classroom were dark skinned than that of the show slake me and they had last names like garcia and gonzalez and fernandez and they could speak a language i couldn't speak. and i was really shocking to me because they looked exactly like me and get newer. i would say that was probably the first time i was really aware of the fact that they were latinos, but they were different from me. >> host: viewer in esl classes come english as a second language classes? was that -- was not a second-class class citizen type thing? >> guest: yeah, definitely. being an esl student is who you are and that way pe
the new err, era of limit? >> guest: i tell the story of smog in los angeles which was an unsolvable problem. it got solved. it took regulations pushing technology. climate is just a bigger cement, global issue. and i was going to write one chapter on it because i wondered how did climate become such an issue, and i found myself writing six because it was so interesting, and it started with a small band of scientists in the 19th century who were worried about another ice age. in the 20th century it was sign terrorists worried about carbon and how that would drive up temperatures and global warming, and i think we've seen it's very hard to get a global solution to it. but it's really interesting. u.s. emissions are down now about, like, 17% from where they were in 2005. why? because we're using more natural gas to generate electricity rather than coal. so there's not one solution. i think something that will have an impact on climate is, obviously, more efficient automobiles. less gasoline usage means less carbon in the air. >> host: next call for daniel yergin comes from dan in depp
to see what happens. this is in los angeles. there was a neighborhood of scientists that lived in an area and protesters would not protest at the university. they would find out where the researchers lived in protest outside their house. and this of course is frightening for scientist. in fact when i was at the university of washington we would get e-mails once a year saying the animal rights protesters were back, be careful, don't engage with them. because they have a history of violence. they have a history of intimidating researchers and just to give you an idea of how loony these people are, one of these neighbors puts up a sign that says stop bothering us, we support science in support of his neighbor. one of the animal researchers crossed off science in said torture, we support torture. that is how they view people like me and ken, we we are torturous. we are not helping, we are not helping medical science we are animal torturers. the bottom right, lawrence summers who was fired from harvard essentially, he was pushed out the door for making the radical claim that men and women migh
states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking and national review among other journals. he's a senior fellow at the claire monththe mission to e ree the principles of the american found ming is the intellectual muscle of the i guess -- mission pings. he teaches in the key fellow programs. the fellows program and the lincoln fellows program. most important he's the editor of the clermont review books. a public cage of the clermont substitute. i encourage you to sib croib. it is the most eloquent and well written attract review of books published in the united states and it is so because it is edited by chairmans kessler. he's been thinking, teaching and write l for conservativism for some time. and he is now down having very liberal if not revolutionary which say he's written a book largely based on president obama's writing speeches and interviews. and set out to understand an explain him as he understands andings explains himself. as a result he's come to the conclusion that it tur
. it came to light early in 2010, you may recall that there was a revelation in los angeles at the republican national committee had been entertaining at a lesbian bondage her club. for the party of family values, this did not work well. they could not raise a dime. in april, he had a luncheon in his house in washington dc. it was cohosted by ed glaspie, a former chair of the rnc. and they had about two dozen people over and came away with tens of millions of dollars. that luncheon alone gave them about four times as much money as the entire republican party. so karl rove was effectively establishing an apparatus. it gave them an enormous amount of power and authority with almost no responsibility. he had his hands on the purse strings. this led to the 2010 legislative elections. they raised a total of $300 million. they took 63 seats in the house. suddenly, obama's big advantage was gone and he had no real authority. so the question is, what did he do with the money? what is he going to do with the money? he is going to go into the battleground states. i started look at wha
suspected it. after some newspaper reporters tracked down been living in los angeles. but there were others along the way. it was for 1957. when he gave his filibuster, for 24 hours in a team and. there was an item published in african-american newspaper, the chicago defender and both -- the bold was puzzling over how was that there was need to speak for 24 hours and 18 minutes with only one bathroom break. you've got to keep your voice lubricated, right question got to keep drinking water. the story that he told to the press was that he gone down to the senate steam room and have intentionally dehydrated himself. so that when he drank water his body would absorb it like a sponge. i asked a urologist friend of mind about the viability of the, he was pretty dubious. but that's the story. that's a story that's always been told. in about that piece, they said the rumor around capitol hill was a thurmond have been outfitted with a device designed for long motor trips. some type of catheter like device. what's interesting about that is there's a memoir published a couple years ago by an african-
. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award, on growing an illegal alien in los angeles, sunday night. part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> here's a look at books being published. mark bowden, author of black hawk down, chronicles the hunt for osama bin laden called, the finish. the killing of osama bin laden. journalist michael dons recounts the last six months of world war ii and the beginning of the cold war, six months in 1945, from world war to cold war. >> and william skinner one of the founders of the american silk industry. a man who turned disaster into destiny. >> in master of the mountain, thomas jefferson and his slaves, historian winecheck friends the findings of recent archaeological work at jefferson's estate, monticello, and a science writer writes about the search for earth's twin. look for these titles in the coming week. >> 50 years ago, president job john f. kennedy was in the midst of the cuban missle crisis. >> george ball, johnson, george bundy. >> it's the 50th anniversary of the cuban missile crisis. with historyian, scholars, film
a visit to the campus of someone named frank wilkinson who had been a housing official in los angeles and had been called to testify before the house un-american activities committee and refused. wilkinson was going to come to the campus and give a speech. certain people were very unhappy about this. this memo summarizes that and we see on the last page hoover's handwriting and his characteristic jagged score all, he writes i am absolutely opposed to this crowd of bleeding hearts at berkeley using the fbi to get off the hook. i know kerr is no good and i doubt the vice chancellor, is. that to me was an astonishing document. here was the head of the nation's largest law enforcement agency saying very bluntly that the head of his leading public university and one of the most eminent educators in america was rotten to the court essentially. is reflected the fbi's view of clark kerr. >> later intervened with lyndon johnson when he was considering clark kerr for a cabinet. >> he did. what led up to that in 1961, in 1964 the free speech movement erupted at uc-berkeley. students including ma
there was a revelation in los angeles that the republican national committee had been entertaining its donors add a lesbian bondage themed strip club. for the party of family values, that did not work well. they could not raise a dime, and this gave rove his opening, and so in april, he had a lunch chon at his -- luncheon at his house in washington, d.c. on weaver terrace, hosted by the former chair of the rnc, had two dozen people over, and came away with tens and tens of millions of dollars, and that luncheon alone gave them four times as much money as the entire republican party so rovefuls effectively establishing an apparatus that gave him an enormous amount of power and authority with almost no responsibility. he reported to no one. he had his hands on the purse strings ling to the 2010 elections, raising a total of $300 million, and swept congress. they took 63 seats in the house, and suddenly obama's big advantage was gone. he had no real authority. this money, so the question is what did he do with the money? it's not what is he going to do with the money, but it's going in the battlegro
may recall, there was a revelation in los angeles the republican national committee had been entertaining its donors had a lesbian bondage the themed strip club. and for the party of family values it did not work too well, so they could not raise a dime. and this gave him his opening. so in april he had a luncheon at his house. in washington d.c. it was co-hosted by ed gillespie , a former chair of the rnc, and they had about two dozen people over and came away with tens and tens of millions of dollars. and that luncheon alone gave them about four times as much money as the entire republican party. so he was effectively establishing an apparatus that gave him an enormous amount of power and authority with almost no responsibility. he reported to no one, but he had his hands on the purse strings. and this led to the 2010 legislative election. they raised a total of $300 million swept congress. they took 63 seats in the house, and suddenly obama bigger advantage was gone. he had no real authority. this money -- so, the question is, what did he do with the money? what is he goin
as a reading specialist, and my masters' as a reading specialist, and my undergraduate is los angeles arts. i became a curriculum specialist or supervisor of teachers for the vast part of the career. i have a vast perspective on what needs to be done in the educational system, and i just think we're not -- we keep trying to put band-aids on what the problems are in the country, and i think we just need to start from scratch with a long term plan. >> host: we appreciate it. tom, in your column in the new york city times, your e-mail is at the end of the column? >> guest: yes, uh-huh. >> host: if shemented to contact you, she can go to the new york times website? >> guest: yes, absolutely. >> host: what are we doing right and wrong? >> guest: the book is about education, what you need to know to be prepared for globalization and the i.t. revolution are merging. there's two challenges. bring the bottom to the average so much faster. that's the three reading, writing, and arrhythmia tick. that's where the three c's, tony wagner from harvard calls creativity, collaboration, and communication. we h
in the southern pacific station here in los angeles and they kissed the ground. look. the american film institute has given me this life achievement award. and for that i am thinking them and all my friends who have come here. but for america, just for living here i kiss the ground. thank you very much. ♪ >> let's face it. if you're a liberal you probably did not get a chill like we did over the immortal words in that speech. let's face it. i don't think we are in any danger witnessing a typical liberal offer to kiss the ground of the analysis of america anytime soon. and finally, the poor bus and, from low one many. the grey seal has done everything that liberals despise right up their front and center. your ego holding arrows. what good does possibly serve aside from celebrating the violent but less than liberals in americans. it doesn't matter to them that he is clutching the olive branch of peace, making the visual point to teddy roosevelt labeled under 50 years later with the words speak softly and carry a big stick. liberals don't think we need to sharpen their rose. they would prefer the
. it came in early 2010, you may recall there was a revelation in los angeles that the republican national committee had been intertaping its dore -- donors at a lesbian bondage theme strip club, and as a party of family values, it didn't work well. they didn't raise a dime. this gave rove the opening. in april, he had a lunch chon at his house in washington, d.c. on weaver terrace. it was cohosted by ed gilispe, former chair of the rnc. they had two dozen people over, and they came away with tens of millions of dollars giving them four times the amount of money as the entire republican party. rove was effectively establishing an apparatus giving him an enormous amount of power and authority with no responsibility. he reported to no one, but he had hands on the purse pursestrings, and this led to the 2010 legislative lexeses. they raised a toe call of $-- a total of $300 million, and they swept congress taking 63 seats in the house, and suddenly obama's big advantage was gone. he had no real authority. this money -- so the question is what did he do with the money? it's not what is he goin
schools in los angeles where students wouldn't have gotten in without references to see that those students had better outcomes. us started looking into this and look for a relevant database to test this and in 2004-2005 developed the paper that first discusses the issue in law school context and found this is quite a large problem, nationally the great bulk of minority students especially african-american students were receiving large preferences on a scale of a couple hundred spt points. traits were generally poor for this group. only a third of black starting law school graduating and passing the bar and this was affecting the lives of a substantially large majority of people who were supposedly being helped by preferences. what really struck me when the article came out was the institutional response. the collective unwillingness of a great many, the instinctive reaction of a lot of institutions to restrict data that was already very hard to get. the fact that there was no law school in the country where someone who received a preference could find out what their prospects were
at the schools and los angeles where the students with preferences would have gotten in without preference to see that those students seemed to have much better outcomes so i started looking into this and looked for the databases that could help test it, and by 2004, 2005, developed the paper that we first discussed this in the context and found that this was quite a large problem that nationally the great bulk of the minority students especially african-american students were not receiving very large preference is typically on a scale of a couple hundred s.a.t. points or ten to 15 that the traits were generally very poor for this group only about one-third starting infil law school in early 2000 were graduating and passing the bar on their first attempt. this was affecting the lives of a very large majority of people who were supposedly being helped by preferences. what really struck me is when the article came out when the institutional response. the collective unwillingness of a great many legal academics to engage the salles and the instinctive reaction of the institutions to further restrict
. [laughter] i'm proud to say that i've actually signed the colder productions in los angeles, the producer of all about jack has signed us up at our book has become the option, so we're very hopeful. i'm sure if you read text message or twitter, we'll get it. thank you. [applause] he met chris, have you landed an elusive movie deal yet? >> no, i haven't. i'm hoping for negotiations with anyone -- we know the mafia in this country became strong after public is a shame. what is your problem should marijuana be legalized in the mid-states and taxed? [applause] >> technically marijuana has never been legalized anywhere in the world yet it's been decriminalized. i'm sort of torn on that issue because i have four children. i don't want them to experiment with the drug convict the same time they realized as an economist that he take the profit motive away from the cartel's come and they eventually will cease to exist. the initial pain would be unbelievable, but it's difficult to say what direction that would go in. but i do think it would in the short-term the pain would be unbearable and that's
of his career at time magazine, first as president of time canada and toronto and then as los angeles manager. he has also been a publisher of newsweek magazine and the vice-president of sales, marketing, and operations for yahoo canada, so he is obviously covering the digital ground as well as the historical and archival ground. welcome to you both. thank you both for these marvelous books. i have had such a good time reading them. and reading the overlaps and the discrepancies. the first thing i want to bring up actually is a very interesting discrepancy between the two. these two people who came together in marriage ladybird johnson and lyndon johnson incredibly different personalities. i'm sure most, if not all of you are familiar with the idiosyncrasies and a famous legends about lbj, shall we say, iran stability, crudeness, larger-than-life personality, contradictory nature, and absolute will to get things done and the things he got done were very important things. he could not have done these things, it is my belief, especially after reading these books, without ladybird. ladyb
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